NewsOctober 11 2017

Well deserved recognition

Posted by Lucy

Well deserved recognition
 
   My name is Owen St. Clair, I am the superintendent at Wyoming Indian Schools in Ethete, Wy.  
   This past weekend both our cross country teams competed in the Lakota Nation Invitational in Rapid City, SD. I want to share with you the exemplary sportsmanship shown by one of your students, Brenden Estes. 
  My son, Owen Jr., is a freshman on our Chiefs cross country team and has Down Syndrome. Owen Jr., is always far behind other runners but has the will to finish whatever he does. During the race Saturday, Brenden had been encouraging Owie (Owen Jr’s nickname), but with about a 1/2 mile left in the race he started running with Owie. He had a backpack on and carrying some things, his mother told him to put it on the ground and she would pick it up. At that point, Brenden joined Owie with nothing but encouragement and praise. Runners from our cross country team joined Brenden to help Owie finish the cross country race.  
  As a parent who has a son with a disability, you don’t find many kids who will go out of there way to help and encourage. Brenden showed true sportsmanship in helping Owie, but I am more impressed with who Brenden is. After the race, our high school country coach thanked Brenden for what he did, Brenden mentioned that’s what he should do. He was presented with one of our cross country shirts. 
  As an administrator, these are the type of kids that should be celebrated. He showed his true heart which is powerful, and shows great leadership.

NewsOctober 11 2017

NRCS Announces EQIP Program Signup Deadline October 20, 2017

Posted by Lucy

NRCS Announces EQIP Program Signup Deadline October 20, 2017
 
   NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE (NRCS), Huron, S.D. October 5, 2017 – U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) officials announce October 20, 2017 as the batching date for applications for the popular Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) administered by the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). 
  Landowners seeking to address natural resource concerns on their property are encouraged to apply for participation in the USDA’s EQIP. As a voluntary program, EQIP offers landowners both financial and technical assistance for a wide range of practices, explains NRCS EQIP Coordinator Jennifer Wurtz, Huron, SD, “Anything from practices on cropland, cover crops, rotational cropland, no till practices, grassland practices such as prescribed grazing, water development, wildlife habitat and a specific initiative to develop honeybee habitat.”  
  The first step in addressing resource concerns through EQIP is to formulate a conservation plan. Plans should strive to improve soil health, water and air quality as well as other natural resources. Wurtz says NRCS conservation employees work one-on-one with landowners. “We provide technical assistance to help identify resource concerns that you may have on your operation. We offer ideas for different treatments because there may be a wide range of options to address the resource concerns on your operation. After that, then we look at the USDA programs that may fit your operation.”  
  The EQIP program provides financial and technical assistance to help farmers and ranchers voluntarily implement conservation practices to improve natural resources on working agricultural lands. Payment is provided for a variety of practices to address resource concerns such as water quality, grazing land health and productivity, soil erosion and soil quality, and wildlife habitat development.  
  There are several initiative areas for additional emphasis: Honey Bee Pollinator, National Water Quality Initiative, Soil Health Initiative, Sage Grouse Initiative, and the Red River Basin Initiative. Operators or landowners interested in applying for the EQIP can fill out an application at any time. However the next batching date for fiscal year 2018 EQIP funding is Oct. 20, 2017. Wurtz encourages people to apply early. Applications are available online or at any USDA Service Center. 
  For information about technical assistance and conservation programs, visit www.nrcs.usda.gov/GetStarted. For more information about the EQIP or to apply, please contact your local NRCS office or visit www.nrcs.usda.gov/Programs/FinancialAssistance/EQIP.

NewsOctober 04 2017

Presho Library hosts book fair

Posted by Lucy

Presho Library hosts book fair 
 
LaVerne Olson, Presho City Librarian, helps Jordie Terca’s Presho kindergarten students make purchases on Friday, September 29 during the book fair. Pictured l-r: Shayne Langenbau and Rozin Slaba make their purchases with LaVerne Olson.

NewsOctober 04 2017

Newspaper front pages go all white this week

Posted by Lucy

Newspaper front pages go all white this week 
 
  Lyman County Herald is joining more than 100 newspapers across South Dakota and North Dakota this week to participate in a “whiteout,” a project to demonstrate visually what it would be like if there was no newspaper serving the community. 
  The blank front page is meant to highlight the role that newspapers in both Dakotas have in telling the stories of the community and in keeping the community connected. 
  This is also National Newspaper Week, an annual observance to promote the importance of newspapers and journalism in the communities they serve. 
  The community newspaper is the main source for all things local -- local news, information and advertising,” said Kelli Bultena, president of South Dakota Newspaper Association and publisher of the Lennox Independent and Tea Weekly. “Newspaper journalists cover school board meetings, the local sports teams, community celebrations and so much more. 
  Imagine what it would be like if there was no newspaper to cover the community. That is the message this two-state whiteout project is meant to convey this week,” Bultena said. 
  Bultena added that even though the front page is blank, the news that would normally be on page one can be found on other pages in this edition. 
  North Dakota Newspaper Association President Harvey Brock, publisher of the Dickinson Press, said leaving front pages blank is a significant commitment by newspaper publishers, but those who are doing it are convinced the message of the whiteout is critically important. 
  Publishers and their staffs are tired of the narrative that people have fled from newspapers and are now getting their news from social and online media, because it simply isn’t true,” Brock said.
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